1. One change at a time

You don't have to do a complete 180 overnight.  Start with one or two things and add as you go.  Trying to tackle too much can be so overwhelming and you might give up because you don't appear to be making as much progress as you'd like.  If you've got a long list, pick 1 big goal and a couple small goals to work on each month or every two months.

2. Resolutions don't just involve the gym

Most people associate Jan 1 with the day that newbies flood the gym.  But your resolutions don't have to be connected to just losing weight or fitness.  A great resolution, if you don't already have one, is to set up a rainy day fund.  My newest favorite thing is Digit (check it out here).  You connect it to your checking account and it analyzes your income/expenses and withdraws small amounts of money that you aren't using.  I've saved over $1k without doing a thing.  

3. Track It

There are a ton of apps/sites out there geared towards helping people track their goals.  For example, if your goals involve fitness or eating habits look at MyFitnessPal.  Want to be better with your money? Mint.  Paying of debt?  ReadyForZero.  Not only can this keep you on track in the big picture, but if you're struggling you can look back and see how far you've progressed - even if it feels like you haven't moved.

4. It's not all or nothing

Whether your goal is to lose weight or learn a new skill, break it down into small chunks so that you can see your progress.  It's defeating to set a goal too big and then not reach it - or not reach it as fast as you originally planned.

5. Pin it up

Create a dream board.  Find pictures and words that make you think of your goals - whether they are 1 week goals or 5 year.  Pin up reminders in places you see often, like the refrigerator or bathroom mirror.

6. Talk about it

Share your goals.  Whether it's sharing in a 365-photo challenge group or just talking with friends, talk about what you're doing.  You never know when you might inspire someone else to do something great.

7. Ask for support

There's nothing wrong with asking for help.  If you're anything like me you want to keep control over the things you do, but sometimes you truly have to admit that someone knows better.  If you're struggling, ask!  You'll probably find plenty of other people who got stuck in the same spot you are.

8. Reflect on the past

When you start planning goals for the future it's often helpful to look back on the past.  If you know that your first quarter of the year is always super busy then it probably isn't the best time to sign up for a 5 day/week course at the community college.  Consider the rest of your life when planning out your resolutions.

9. There are 12 months in the year

Everyone is well intentioned in January.  But by February you might be going "what happened to my resolutions????".  The year is 12 months long.  If the first month or two doesn't pan out, regroup and try again.  Sometimes you might discover that your original goal needs tweaking.  

10. But time slips away...

Just because you know that you can start again doesn't mean you should keep putting off getting started.  Sometimes resolutions are kinda time critical.  It's important to write down your goals and even better to plan them out on a calendar.  If you use a planner, write in your plans.  If you are a Google Calendar user they introduced a goal option that can help automatically schedule your goals for you.  Check it out here.

 

 

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